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Flight 370: Photos of the Search for Missing Malaysian Plane

A Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777
A Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 lands at Los Angeles International Airport in February 2013.
(Image: © Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 image via Shutterstock)

Floating Debris?

Thai Satellite Spots 300 Objects Possibly Tied to Malaysian Airlines Flight 370

(Image credit: Geo Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency)

The Thailand Earth Observation Satellite (Thaichote) spotted more than 300 floating objects in a part of the Indian Ocean where investigators think the missing Malaysian Airlines jetliner may have crashed.

Another debris image?

satellite image of possible malaysia airlines flight 370 debris, captured on March 18, 2014.

(Image credit: China State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense (SASTIND))

This Chinese satellite photo shows an object in the southern Indian Ocean that might be debris from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 that disappeared with 239 people aboard in early March. This satellite photo was obtained by a Chinese Earth-observation satellite on March 18, 2014 and released by the country's State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense on March 22. [Read full story on possible debris image]

Search area: March 22

map showing possible debris from Flight 370 and search area.

(Image credit: Australian Maritime Safety Authority)

The object spotted in the Chinese satellite image captured on March 18 are located southwest of the two pieces of possible Flight 370 debris spotted in March 16 satellite images, inside of the area where the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Search and Rescue plans to search on Saturday, March 22.

Lost at Sea

Possible Malaysia Airlines Debris - Satellite Photo

(Image credit: Digital Globe/Australian Maritime Safety Authority)

Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 mysteriously disappeared on March 8, less than an hour after it took off en route to Beijing, China.

These satellite photos, obtained by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, show objects that may be debris from the missing plane in the Indian Ocean. [Read full story]

Possible Debris Found?

Possible Malaysia Airlines Plane Debris in Indian Ocean

(Image credit: Digital Globe/Australian Maritime Safety Authority)

These satellite photos of objects in the Indian Ocean may be debris from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, which disappeared on March 8 during a scheduled flight to Beijing, China.

The Search Continues

Map of Search Area for Missing Malaysian Airlines Plane

(Image credit: Australian Maritime Safety Authority)

A map of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority's search area for the missing Malaysian airliner.

False Leads

Chinese Satellite Image of Possible Malaysian Airlines Debris

(Image credit: China Resources Satellite Application Center)

A Chinese satellite imaged three objects floating in the South China Sea on March 9, 2014, but officials later confirmed that the objects were not parts of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370, which went missing on March 8.

Not in the South China Sea

Chinese Satellite Image of Possible Malaysian Airlines Debris #2

(Image credit: China Resources Satellite Application Center)

Three objects seen floating in the South China Sea by a Chinese satellite on March 9, 2014, were not pieces of debris from the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370, according to officials.

AP-3C Orion

Royal Australia Air Force AP-3C Orion sent to search for Flight 370 debris.

(Image credit: Department of Defence)

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority sent four aircraft on Thursday, March 20, to an area spanning nearly 9,000 square miles (23,000 square kilometers) located approximately 1,550 miles (2,500 km) southwest of Perth. The craft included two Royal Australia Air Force AP-3C Orions, one shown here.

Cumulative Search Map

map showing search areas for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

(Image credit: Australian Maritime Safety Authority)

A map showing the area searched in the Indian Ocean for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared from radar screens on March 8 less than an hour after departing, with 239 people onboard, from Kuala Lumpur en-route for Beijing.