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Are Gifted Kids More Sensitive to Screen Violence?

A worried little boy sitting on a bench at a playground.
Violent events can frighten or worry kids, researchers have found. (Image credit: Brian A Jackson / Shutterstock.com)

Updated on Jan. 13 at 5:49 p.m. ET.

We have removed the article entitled "Are Gifted Kids More Sensitive to Screen Violence?" after being informed by The Conversation (the original publisher of the article) that two of the authors, Jonathan Wai and Brad Bushman, have retracted the study on which the article was based from the peer-reviewed journal, The Gifted Child Quarterly.

This is their explanation of why they took this step:

"Questions have been raised about the pattern of results in the Cetin, Wai, Altay, and Bushman (2016) article [Effects of Violent Media on Verbal Task Performance in Gifted and General Cohort Children]. Unfortunately, the data collection procedures could not be verified because the author who collected the data (Cengiz Altay) could not be contacted following the attempted coup in Turkey. Therefore, as the integrity of the data could not be confirmed, we are retracting the study."

The Conversation editors expressed their commitment to accuracy: "We remain committed to providing accurate and reliable information, and to acknowledging problems or errors in an open and transparent way whenever they occur."

Maria Balinska, Editor, The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.