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Cache of Ancient Silver Coins Found in Israel (Photos)

Hasmonean estate house

Hasmonean estate house

(Image credit: Griffin Aerial Photography, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.)

Aerial photograph of the agricultural estate house in Modi'in, Israel, dating back to the Hasmonean period — 140 BCE to 116 BCE — where the hidden collection of coins was found.

[Read the full story about the discovery of this ancient coin cache.]

Cache of coins

Cache of silver coins

(Image credit: Assaf Peretz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.)

The cache of silver coins was discovered concealed in a rocky niche in a wall of the ancient estate house, in Modi'in, Israel.

A handful of silver

Cache of silver coins

(Image credit: Assaf Peretz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.)

Archaeologists found 16 silver coins in a hidden cache. They date back to 126 BCE and were stamped with images of King Antiochus VII and his brother, Demetrius II.

Uncovering the hoard

Retrieving the rocks

(Image credit: Assaf Peretz, Israel Antiquities Authority.)

Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) archaeologist Shahar Krispin, during the discovery of the silver coin hoard.

Retrieving the coins

Retrieving the rocks

(Image credit: Assaf Peretz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority)

IAA archaeologist Shahar Krispin examines the cache of coins — concealed for more than 2,000 years — which included shekels and half-shekels (tetradrachms and didrachms).

[Read the full story about the discovery of this ancient coin cache.]

King Antiochus VII

A coin of Antiochus VII

(Image credit: Clara Amit)

A coin of Antiochus VII, and the rest of the coins that were discovered in the hidden cache, which archaeologists say were likely minted in Tyre, a Phoenician port city.

A chalk cup from the time of the Second Temple period

Chalk cup from the time of the Second Temple period

(Image credit: Avraham Tendler)

IAA archaeologist Jenny Marcus holds a chalk cup from the time of the Second Temple — 530 BCE to 70 BCE — which was unearthed in the estate house. According to Jewish law, vessels made of chalk cannot become ritually unclean.

A place to hide

a hiding refuge

(Image credit: Assaf Peretz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.)

Abraham Tendler, the excavation director, inside a hiding refuge that was connected to a ritual bath known as a (miqwe), during the Bar Kokhba uprising (132 CE to 136 CE).

[Read the full story about the discovery of this ancient coin cache.]