In Photos: The Clovis Culture & Stone Tools

native american 1

(Image credit: Sarah L. Anzick)

A large (approx. 255mm x 122mm) tabular core/ late-interval biface made of brown chert along with the beveled end of an osseous rod.

native american 2

(Image credit: Sarah L. Anzick)

A nearly complete projectile point of dendritic chert, a mid-interval biface of translucent quartz, displaying relatively heavy red ochre residue and an "end-beveled" osseous rod, also exhibiting red ochre residue. These artifacts are technologically consistent with artifacts of the Clovis complex.

native american 3

(Image credit: Sarah L. Anzick)

A nearly complete projectile point of dendritic chert, a mid-interval biface of translucent cryptocrystalline quartz, a mid to late-interval biface of dendritic chert, and a "dual,end-beveled" osseous rod, all of which exhibit various amounts of red ochre residue.

native american 4

clovis burial site in montana

(Image credit: Mike Waters)

The genome sequence of a male infant who lived 12,600 years ago from a Clovis burial site (shown here with poles) in Wilsall, Mont., suggests many contemporary Native Americans are direct descendants of the people who made and used Clovis tools.

First American Settlers Not Who We Thought

(Image credit: Center for the Study of the First Americans/Texas A&M University)

Clovis points from various sites in North America.

Western Stemmed Projectile Points from Paisley Caves

Displayed in the hand of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins are three bases for Western Stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The bases date to some 13,000 years ago.

(Image credit: Jim Barlow)

Displayed in the hand of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins are three bases for Western Stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The bases date to some 13,000 years ago.