About the author
Megan Gannon
Megan Gannon, Live Science Contributor

Megan has been writing for Live Science and Space.com since 2012. Her interests range from archaeology to space exploration, and she has a bachelor's degree in English and art history from New York University. Megan spent two years as a reporter on the national desk at NewsCore. She has watched dinosaur auctions, witnessed rocket launches, licked ancient pottery sherds in Cyprus and flown in zero gravity. Follow her on Twitter and Google+.

  • Odd Hallucination: Woman Hears Forgotten Songs

    Odd Hallucination: Woman Hears Forgotten Songs

    August 20, 2013 | Article

    Researchers describe a woman who started having musical hallucinations. She did not recognize the songs in her head, but when she sang or hummed them for her husband, he identified them as popular tunes.
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  • The Quantified Sex Life: Apps Track Data in the Bedroom

    The Quantified Sex Life: Apps Track Data in the Bedroom

    August 19, 2013 | Article

    As the so-called quantified self movement gains footing, there's no shortage of gadgets and apps to help people track their latest physical coups. A new app, Spreadsheets, keeps tabs on its users' loudest, longest and most zealous encounters in bed.
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  • Oldest Rock Art in North America Revealed

    Oldest Rock Art in North America Revealed

    August 14, 2013 | Article

    The ancient carvings on boulders at Nevada's dried up Winnemucca Lake may be the oldest surviving petroglyphs in North America. A new analysis puts the rock art between 10,500 and 14,800 years old.
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  • In Photos: Ancient Maya Carvings Exposed in Guatemala

    In Photos: Ancient Maya Carvings Exposed in Guatemala

    August 09, 2013 | Image Album

    While digging through a looter's tunnel in the ancient Maya city of Holmul, archaeologists exposed an amazingly well-preserved stucco frieze on the outside of a 1,400-year-old building.
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  • Diagnosis Zombie: The Science Behind the Undead Apocalypse

    Diagnosis Zombie: The Science Behind the Undead Apocalypse

    August 08, 2013 | Article

    LiveScience talked to Dr. Steven Schlozman, also known as 'Dr. Zombie,' about the real-world concepts behind Hollywood portrayals of the undead, from the likely neurological problems of zombies to the virulent spread of their affliction.
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  • In Photos: Norway's Spooky Seafloor Vents

    In Photos: Norway's Spooky Seafloor Vents

    August 06, 2013 | Image Album

    Hydrothermal chimneys well inside the Arctic Circle support strange life on the seafloor. One recently discovered complex of vents, Loki's Castle, has inspired a bid to protect these deep-sea resources.
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  • Pink Alien Planet Is Smallest Photographed Around Sun-Like Star

    Pink Alien Planet Is Smallest Photographed Around Sun-Like Star

    August 06, 2013 | Article

    Astronomers have snapped a picture of the smallest alien planet yet found around a star like our sun using a technique to photograph exoplanets directly from Earth. Bluer than expected, the gas planet would be the color of a "dark cherry blossom."
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  • Giant Water Bug Stalks and Devours Fish

    Giant Water Bug Stalks and Devours Fish

    July 31, 2013 | Article

    Insects are pretty low on the food chain, but there are some bugs that turn the tables, making meals out of animals like fish and amphibians. Scientists captured footage of a ferocious water bug ambushing and eating a small fish from the inside out.
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  • How Babies Learn to Fear Heights

    How Babies Learn to Fear Heights

    July 26, 2013 | Article

    As any parent knows, babies aren't born with a fear of heights. Infants can be frighteningly bold around the edge of a bed or a changing table. New research shows infants may build an avoidance of heights once they get more experience crawling.
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  • Spanish Fort Built by Gold Hunters Discovered

    Spanish Fort Built by Gold Hunters Discovered

    July 24, 2013 | Article

    Archaeologists uncovered a fort built by gold-hunting Spanish colonizers in the Appalachian foothills of North Carolina. It's the oldest European fort ever found in the interior of the United States, predating Jamestown and Roanoke.
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