About the author
Megan Gannon
Megan Gannon, Live Science Contributor

Megan has been writing for Live Science and Space.com since 2012. Her interests range from archaeology to space exploration, and she has a bachelor's degree in English and art history from New York University. Megan spent two years as a reporter on the national desk at NewsCore. She has watched dinosaur auctions, witnessed rocket launches, licked ancient pottery sherds in Cyprus and flown in zero gravity. Follow her on Twitter and Google+.

  • Literary Fiction May Boost Mind-Reading Skills

    Literary Fiction May Boost Mind-Reading Skills

    October 04, 2013 | Article

    Reading a piece of fiction could enhance one's "mind-reading" skills, a new study finds, but a short story by Anton Chekov may be more effective than a passage penned by Danielle Steel.
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  • In Photos: Seeing Sharks Up Close

    In Photos: Seeing Sharks Up Close

    October 03, 2013 | Image Album

    Using images captured during his career as a shark photographer, Thomas Peschak makes a stunning case that the predators are worthy of our respect and protection in his new book "Sharks and People."
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  • Images: A Goosefish's Ethereal Veil of Eggs

    Images: A Goosefish's Ethereal Veil of Eggs

    September 26, 2013 | Image Album

    Monkfish may themselves be aesthetically challenged, but they lay their eggs in the form of a gauzy, billowy veil that drifts in the ocean for days.
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  • Size Mattered to Ancient Bear, Penis Bones Suggest

    Size Mattered to Ancient Bear, Penis Bones Suggest

    September 24, 2013 | Article

    Scientists don't have any footage to shed light on the sex lives of ancient bears, but fossil penis bones can tell all. One extinct bear had a surprisingly large penis bone that suggests it had infrequent but long-lasting sex sessions, new research shows.
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  • States With More Guns Have More Homicides

    States With More Guns Have More Homicides

    September 18, 2013 | Article

    A new study found that states with higher rates of firearms in the home have disproportionately big numbers of gun-related homicides. The findings suggest that measures to make guns less available could cut the rate of killings, the researchers say.
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  • 10-Inch-Long Earwax Plug Reveals Blue Whale's Life History

    10-Inch-Long Earwax Plug Reveals Blue Whale's Life History

    September 17, 2013 | Article

    A blue whale's buildup of earwax archives its history of exposure to chemicals like stress hormones and pollutants, which could allow researchers to piece together new details about the animal's life, a study shows.
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  • Female Squid Wear Fake Testes to Avoid Male Advances

    Female Squid Wear Fake Testes to Avoid Male Advances

    September 16, 2013 | Article

    The females in one species of squid may have a natural defense for escaping unwanted male attention: special light-reflecting cells that can create the illusion of testes.
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  • Blobfish Named World's Ugliest Animal

    Blobfish Named World's Ugliest Animal

    September 12, 2013 | Article

    The grotesque, perpetually grumpy-looking blobfish has been crowned the world's ugliest animal. The deep-sea creature will serve as the hideous public face of the U.K.-based Ugly Animal Preservation Society.
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  • Faces of Ancient Mexico Revealed in Skulls

    Faces of Ancient Mexico Revealed in Skulls

    September 12, 2013 | Article

    Long before the arrival of European colonizers, the indigenous people of Mexico showed wide variation in their facial appearance, which perhaps hasn't been fully appreciated, a new study of skulls suggests.
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  • Geology in the City: Central Park Photos

    Geology in the City: Central Park Photos

    September 10, 2013 | Image Album

    Despite impressive landscaping efforts over the last two centuries, New York's Central Park has retained natural features that took thousands of years to form.
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