Video Archive
11 February 2015, 12:02 PM ET
The actor talks about support systems to aid in recover from substance abuse. He also mentions the importance of actors creating an accurate portrayal of a character with a mental illness or addiction.
10 February 2015, 05:20 PM ET
Scientists at NYU are using lollipops to help understand how materials dissolve. "Flowing fluids generate unique shapes through erosion or dissolution," according to NYU assistant professor Leif Ristroph.
10 February 2015, 12:15 PM ET
Test subjects at Penn State were presented letters and numbers arranged in a square, then were asked to recall the corner in which a certain letter or number appeared (easily completed).
10 February 2015, 10:44 AM ET
Researchers have created a cap that electrically stimulates the brain’s medial frontal cortex. Initial studies have shown a boost in learning and improved decision-making with its use.
10 February 2015, 10:23 AM ET
Researchers recently unraveled the mystery of how popcorn pops, capturing the transformation from kernel to popcorn in extreme slow motion of 2000 frames per second; played here 100x more slowly.
09 February 2015, 11:44 AM ET
In this U.Mass study, parents of one group of 6 to 9-month-olds gave unique names to pictures of objects; another called all objects of the same type by their generic label.
07 February 2015, 10:52 AM ET
Side-channel emissions from laptops and smartphones can be detected from a several feet away and transmit data even when not connected to the internet.
05 February 2015, 02:04 PM ET
“Parenthood” stars Craig T. Nelson, Peter Krause, Sam Jaeger and Max Burkholder explain the show's role in starting discussions around mental health issues, particularly Asperger's syndrome – but also substance abuse, aging, depression and more.
05 February 2015, 01:51 PM ET
Scientists, researching ways to detect glacial ice loss, have discovered that distinct "rumbles, snaps and splashes" occur during ice loss, or calving events. This could lead to inexpensive ways to monitors glaciers.
05 February 2015, 12:18 PM ET
n 2010, Frek (a Dutch chimp) has high pitched grunts compared to Lucy (an Edinburgh chimp). By 2013, the grunts of Frek and Lucy have become much more similar.
04 February 2015, 02:00 PM ET
The Euphlyctis kalasgramensis frog has been known as Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis for the last 216 years. But they were incorrectly categorized due to "lack of proper study" says researcher M. Sajid Ali Howlader.
29 January 2015, 06:35 PM ET
Sarah studies apes, monkeys, humans and other primates to understand how cooperation has evolved over time.
28 January 2015, 10:50 AM ET
Experiments with baby chickens suggest they perceive lower values as lying to the left of higher values, similar to how humans use a number-line. If true, this may date back to a common ancestor of birds and people.
27 January 2015, 07:01 PM ET
A scanning electron microscope must look at objects in vacuum in order to work. To study live insects, scientists dipped ants and spider into diluted "tiny spacesuit" surfactant.
26 January 2015, 12:49 PM ET
Scientists have found a way to switch a mouse’s sense of thirst on or off by shining laser light on the animals’ brains.
26 January 2015, 12:28 PM ET
The NOAA GOES-13 satellite captured the massive winter storm bearing down on the east coast of the United States on Jan. 26th, 2015. GOES ‘sees’ infrared radiant energy and reflected visible light.
23 January 2015, 07:25 PM ET
Marine ecologist Paul Sikkel explains why corals are important and how marine life thrives in protected areas.
23 January 2015, 01:58 PM ET
Fish-hunting Conus geographus and Conus tulipa are caught on camera attempting to capture prey by lowering the victim’s blood sugar, retarding their ability to flee.
23 January 2015, 10:17 AM ET
The Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project drilled through the Ross Ice Shelf and found fish living 2400 feet beneath.
22 January 2015, 02:47 PM ET
The company Robotbase is building a personal robot that can keep your home secure, help you chat with loved ones and even read bedtime stories.
21 January 2015, 01:41 PM ET
"It’s a result of human-induced global warming,” says NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Steven Pawson referring to recently released data. Pawson notes how the cold East Coast winter and El Nino event had little effect on the rising temps.
21 January 2015, 11:46 AM ET
Scientists have created a laser-etched form of metal that makes water bounce off straight off it, and could be used in airplane wing coatings and keeping surfaces bacteria-free.
19 January 2015, 11:08 AM ET
Hundreds of charred, rolled papyrus scrolls that were buried after the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79 could be virtually unrolled thanks to a new x-ray method of reading them.
16 January 2015, 11:24 AM ET
Believed to be caused by increasing human contribution of carbon dioxide and heat-trapping gases, the steady increase in average temperatures peaked yet again in 2014. Since 2000, the record for warmest year has been broken 10 times.
14 January 2015, 03:00 PM ET
NASA data shows that average sea ice totals have dropped significantly, with a precipitous fall between 2002 and 2008. Sea level rise is a direct result of sea ice loss.
12 January 2015, 02:00 PM ET
As Arctic permafrost thaws due to rising global temperatures, soil microbes may speed up the rate at which they liberate carbon into the atmosphere.
12 January 2015, 11:20 AM ET
The 415-million-year-old Janusiscus fossil was discovered in Siberia. A study of the skull reveals that it is on the botton of the gnathostomes’ (jawed vertebrates) evolutionary tree.
09 January 2015, 12:35 PM ET
This animation illustrates one mechanism in which HIV enters the T cell of the immune system.
09 January 2015, 10:58 AM ET
Doctors believe that giving premature babies the equivalent of a cup of coffee stimulates the diaphragm, the lungs and the brain. Also, Viagra has been used in babies diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension.
08 January 2015, 03:25 PM ET
A powered exoskeleton from Ekso allows stroke victims and partial spinal cord injury patients, like Shane Mosko, to walk farther, aiding rehabilitation.
 
 
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