A Roman fresco nearly 2,000 years old was unearthed at a construction site in the middle of London. It might be one of the earliest wall paintings of its kind from Roman Britain. [Read the full story on the rare wall mural]

Decorating with nature

This central panel shows the most detailed part of the fresco, with deer and birds decorating the painting. (Credit: MOLA)


Life of the elite

In total, the surviving section of the artwork measures 8 feet (2.4 meters) across and 5 feet (1.5 m) high. It may have decorated the reception room of a wealthy person's home. (Credit: MOLA)


Delicate touch needed

In this image, archaeological conservator Luisa Duarte, of the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA), works on a section of the painting. (Credit: MOLA)


Fragility embodied

After archaeologists removed the 16 major sections of the fresco, still encased in dirt, they cleaned it during a microexcavation in the lab. (Credit: MOLA)


Lucky find

Archaeologists from MOLA discovered the artwork while digging ahead of the construction of an office complex in the middle of the city. (Credit: MOLA)


Prepping for construction

The painted wall was likely sealed underground ahead of the construction of the 2nd Roman Forum of London in the 2nd century A.D. (Credit: MOLA)

Follow Live Science @livescience, Facebook & Google+.